DVD Review: “I Love You Both” Is Complicated And Borderline Dysfunctional

“While the Archibalds can both be admired for acting in and directing the same film, I would hope that in the future, two heads could be better than one in making for a more valuable use of their talents.”


 

Krystal and her twin brother/roommate confront twenty-eight years of their co-dependency when they start dating the same guy.

From the very beginning, this brother-sister relationship speaks volumes about the necessity of being an individual and having a life of one’s own no matter what. While their closeness is admirable, it appears that Donny and Krystal (Real-life siblings Doug and Kristin Archibald) are denying each other the ability to get an external opinion about what life in the real world is really like. What aggravates the plot even further is the parental relationship that seems to be the foundation of awkwardness that permeates throughout the siblings’ lives which, in turn, permeates throughout the film. The real-life siblings, Doug and Kristin Archibald, have the uncanny ability to influence one another in ways that make everyone else uncomfortable.

Aside from their own personal quirks that are revealed in their interactions with others, there also seems to be a dual attraction to others in their social circles who had imperfections of character. While there are humorous situations that cause a chuckle here and there, there is an overwhelming desire to just get through the movie in order to escape a sense of weirdness that never fully comes together to form a sensible plot. This is not due to the LGBT aspect, which is admirable, but it is simply due to too much idealism and not enough reality.

Lucas Neff, who seems to charm the pants off everyone at Doug and Kristin’s birthday party, plays both sides against the middle very well, yet is still a character who seems very flawed. While he is actively searching for a solid relationship, he seems to be more confused by his own identity than the challenge of which sibling would be his best mate. The sibling rivalry that comes as a result of both Doug and Kristin being romantically interested, is more or less par for the course. While the Archibalds can both be admired for acting in and directing the same film, I would hope that in the future, two heads could be better than one in making for a more valuable use of their talents.

Available on DVD & Digital HD Tuesday, September 12th


 

Tracee Bond

Tracee is a movie critic and interviewer who was born in Long Beach and raised in San Diego, California. As a Human Resource Professional and former Radio Personality, Tracee has parlayed her interviewing skills, interest in media, and crossover appeal into a love for the Arts and a passion for understanding the human condition through oral and written expression. She has been writing for as long as she can remember and considers it a privilege to be complimented for the only skill she has been truly able to master without formal training!
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